"I belong in Africa": African-Americans going ‘home’

By Marije Maliepaard        The Ghanaian ethnic group of Akan is (among other aspects) known for their Adinkra symbols. Symbols that represent concepts and are often connected to proverbs. They are used in African fabrics, clothes and pottery and nowadays also in logo’s, advertisements and wall paintings. One of their symbols of a bird stretching back to get an egg, named Sankofa, has become an important representation for Africans in the diaspora. The combination of the symbol and the associated proverb ‘se wo were fi na wosankofa a yenkyi’, which translates to ‘it is not wrong to go …

Lees meer

The reality of race: fieldwork experiences from Ghana

By Marije Maliepaard     Recently my Colombian friend and I were talking about being white in a country like Ghana. I told him I had never been aware of my ‘whiteness’ until I got to Ghana. In reply he said “of course you weren’t aware, you are part of the majority in your country”. We silently continued our walk along the main road in Accra as I pondered his comment. I broke the silence and said, “It’s not only me being part of the majority but I just don’t see it. I don’t recognize people as being black or white.” He firmly …

Lees meer

Gay in Ghana en het homofobe media-offensief

“The practice is alien to the Ghanaian.” Door Rhoda Woets. Op dinsdag 12 maart 2012 toog een woedende groep jongeren in Jamestown, een visserswijk in de hoofdstad Accra, gewapend met stokken naar een woonhuis. Het gerucht ging dat op deze plek een lesbisch bruiloftsfeest gaande was. In een bericht over het oproer gaf de krant The Ghanaian Times niet aan dat het slechts een gerucht betrof: zij publiceerde dit als een fait accompli. Niet de gewelddadige jongeren, maar twee vrouwelijke gasten op het (naar later bleek) verjaardagsfeest, werden “uitgeleverd” aan de politie en brachten de nacht door achter de tralies. …

Lees meer

Fieldwork 2010: The Lingering Field

Anna-Riikka Kauppinen reports from Ghana regarding her research on beauty centers. This post is part of the fieldwork 2010 series. Shea butter is warming up in my hands. I rub my palms together in order to dissolve the waxy texture into a soft and glowing substance. Akosua, 3 years old, is sitting still on the bed. I start applying the cream over her tiny body. First come the shoulders, neck and back. She raises her hands so that I can rub the armpits and stands up to let me work on the belly, buttocks, tights, legs, feet and toes. Lastly, …

Lees meer

Obama in Ghana

Stem deze dagen af op een van de vele radiostations in Accra, Ghana, en het aanstekelijke refrein van de Ghanese reggaezanger Blakk Rasta komt geheid voorbij: Mama! Mama! Com mek wi talk oo Com mek wi talk about Barack Obama Papa! Papa! Com mek wi talk oo Com mek wi talk about Barack Obama Barack Barack, Barack Obama Barack Barack, Barack Obama [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L85YF0pyPH0&feature=PlayList&p=931A7C1483DD2816&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=5] En gepraat wordt er over Barack Obama. In de aanloop naar de ‘first visit to Black Africa by the first Black president of the Unites States’ is de Obamakoorts in alle hevigheid uitgebroken. In woord, beeld, en …

Lees meer